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Theatre Royal Drury Lane

Catherine Street, London WC2B 5JF

Theatre Royal Drury Lane Google Location Map Google Map: Google Location Map
Theatre Royal Drury Lane Seating Plan Seating Plan: Seating Plan Open in new window
Nearest Tube Station Tube Station: Covent Garden (250m)
Parking Parking: Single yellow lines on Russell Street. NCP in Drury Lane. Taxi rank at Covent Garden Piazza end of Russell Street.
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Venue Information:
Guide Dogs Guide Dogs:

Guide dogs not allowed into the auditorium but theatre staff can look after them in an office.

Sound Amplification Infra-Red:

Infra-red system with 10 headsets. Best reception in centre Stalls and centre Circle. Headsets available from duty manager in main foyer. Induction loop at Box Office.

Disabled Wheelchair Access Disabled Access:

Entrance to theatre through signposted door on Russell Street which leads into the left of the Stalls. The door has a bell on the outside. 4 spaces for wheelchairs users, L1 and 35 and K1 and 35, companions can sit in the same row. Transfer seating to aisle seats, wheelchairs can be stored in the Stalls store room (maximum of 2 scooter transferees).

Toilets Toilets:

Adapted toilet to the left inside Russell Street entrance, beside the Stalls.

Steps Steps:

6 steps up to front entrance through swing doors into main foyer and Box Office. Box Office counter to right. 20 steps down then 17 up to Stalls with handrails on both sides, 39 to Dress Circle with a handrail on the right, 61 to Upper Circle with a handrail on both sides. Top stair of each group is highlighted. Theatre open 1 hour before performance.

Air Conditioning Air Conditioning: Yes
Venue Owner Owner: The Really Useful Group Ltd

The Theatre Royal, Drury Lane is a West End theatre in Covent Garden, in the City of Westminster, a borough of London. The building faces Catherine Street (earlier named Bridges or Brydges Street) and backs onto Drury Lane. The building standing today is the most recent in a line of four theatres at the same location dating back to 1663, making it the oldest London theatre. For its first two centuries, Drury Lane could "reasonably have claimed to be London's leading theatre" and thus one of the most important theatres in the English-speaking world. Through most of that time, it was one of a small handful of patent theatres that were granted monopoly rights to the production of "legitimate" (meaning spoken plays, rather than opera, dance, concerts, or plays with music) drama in London.