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Rocket to the Moon

Show Information

  • Booking From:
  • 23-Mar-2011
  • Booking Until:
  • 10-Apr-2011
  • Running Time:
  • To Be Confirmed
  • Genre:
  • Plays

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Rocket to the Moon Tickets

Lyttelton Theatre, The South Bank, London SE1 9PX

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Stunning, stockingless, ruthless in her youth, Cleo Singer arrives in Ben Stark's dental practice and turns his married, humdrum world upside down. She promises passion, escape, if only he knew how. But Stark is not alone in his frustrated dreams and in those stifling, shared offices there's rivalry over a woman discovering life, a woman who's hungry for expression and for love. And she's no pushover, she's looking for the real deal.

Why don't you suddenly ride away, an airplane, a boat! Take a rocket to the moon! Explode!

Written in 1938 by Clifford Odets, the American master of dazzling, acerbic New York repartee, Rocket to the Moon puts opportunity in the way of a quietly desperate man and waits.

None of you can give me what I'm looking for: a whole full world, with all the trimmings.

Evenings: various
Theatre Venue: Lyttelton Theatre
Address: Denman Street, London W1D 7DY
Seating Plan: Seating Plan
Google Map: Google Location Map

The Lyttelton - named after Oliver Lyttelton, Viscount Chandos, whose parents were among the earliest effective campaigners for the National Theatre and who was himself its first chairman - is a proscenium theatre, conventional in its basic shape though not in the excellence of its sightlines and acoustics.

There are no eye-blocking pillars, circle rails, or other familiar hazards and you can see and hear almost equally well from each of its 890 seats. Unlike most traditional theatres, the Lyttelton has an adjustable proscenium. You can make it into an open-end stage; add a forestage; or create an orchestra pit for up to 20 musicians. No seat is further away, here, from the actor's point of command than the distance from the front row of the dress circle in many older, larger theatres.

Author:Clifford Odets
Director:Angus Jackson